"DUM DITTY DUMB" - Crystal Kay [Official Video]
Margaret Cho - Asian Adjacent
Blue Sky
Tribal feat. Shine Blackhawk
Tah Mac “California” feat. Tony DeNiro & Keely
Favianna's Story
Viennie V Hold My Breath
Turn of the Harvest
Synecdoche
Bonobo Documentary
Slingerland Institute
The Michelle Obama DIARIES
"DUM DITTY DUMB" - Crystal Kay [Official Video]

Dum Ditty Dumb


 

Snow White meets Japanese schoolgirl in an animated wonderland that would rival Alice's, in Crystal Kay's latest music video on today's The Plus. The Japanese singer worked with award winning director Tani Ikeda and animator Laura Yilmaz to create a visual playground that melds the human body with unexpected and warped, animated extensions and decorations. 

Laura and Tani have worked together previously through imMEDIAte Justice, a nonprofit that teaches girls filmmaking.

‘Approaching this video as a collaboration was a great experience’ Laura told us. ‘Both Tani and I have very different skill sets, but share a common aesthetic and sensibility. This meant we could split our roles efficiently, trusting each other to find the right people and make the right choices to bring our vision alive.’

The video’s visuals nod to the fashion and energy coming out of Crystal’s home city, Yokohama, whilst also taking into account the U.S. pop sensibility. ‘I’ve seen a lot of Western artists like Avril Lavigne and Katy Perry who exotify Japanese culture in really alienating ways,’ explained Tani. ‘So I wanted to create something that felt aesthetically Japanese American.’

We asked Laura and Tani a little more about their collaboration:

The Plus: What was it like to collaborate with Crystal Kay?
Tani Ikeda:
 Crystal was great! She is huge in Japan and blazed the trail for R&B music there. As a Japanese American, it’s exciting for me to work with a Japanese artist who is breaking into mainstream media in the U.S.

TP: Did you have any particular sources of inspiration?
Laura Yilmaz: 
Yes, the seed of the idea was riffing on classic Snow White and the magic mirror imagery, but with a Japanese pop twist. The idea expanded and developed, so whatever hints of the Snow White mythos might remain are blurred under layers of kaleidoscopic shapes and weirdly deformed limbs!

TI: Also, the Japanese schoolgirl has become a very iconic image to American audiences that embodies quiet, subservient cuteness. We wanted to create imagery of schoolgirls who came alive on screen with explosive energy and dance moves that subverted that stereotype in visually shocking ways.

TP: Were there any particularly difficult aspects of making this video?
LY: 
All the animation for Crystal’s dress is hand drawn frame by frame, meaning we had to track our animation to the live action footage by eye. It was a nightmare to manage the workflow and keep all the animation tracked properly.
In the end we had to compartmentalize the team a bit so each animator could really take ownership of one element: the dress, the schoolgirl arms and faces, etc.

TP: What’s next?
TI: 
I’m in preproduction to direct a larger project this fall, and I think both Laura and I are looking forward to more opportunities to collaborate in the future.

 

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Dum Ditty Dumb


 

Snow White meets Japanese schoolgirl in an animated wonderland that would rival Alice's, in Crystal Kay's latest music video on today's The Plus. The Japanese singer worked with award winning director Tani Ikeda and animator Laura Yilmaz to create a visual playground that melds the human body with unexpected and warped, animated extensions and decorations. 

Laura and Tani have worked together previously through imMEDIAte Justice, a nonprofit that teaches girls filmmaking.

‘Approaching this video as a collaboration was a great experience’ Laura told us. ‘Both Tani and I have very different skill sets, but share a common aesthetic and sensibility. This meant we could split our roles efficiently, trusting each other to find the right people and make the right choices to bring our vision alive.’

The video’s visuals nod to the fashion and energy coming out of Crystal’s home city, Yokohama, whilst also taking into account the U.S. pop sensibility. ‘I’ve seen a lot of Western artists like Avril Lavigne and Katy Perry who exotify Japanese culture in really alienating ways,’ explained Tani. ‘So I wanted to create something that felt aesthetically Japanese American.’

We asked Laura and Tani a little more about their collaboration:

The Plus: What was it like to collaborate with Crystal Kay?
Tani Ikeda:
 Crystal was great! She is huge in Japan and blazed the trail for R&B music there. As a Japanese American, it’s exciting for me to work with a Japanese artist who is breaking into mainstream media in the U.S.

TP: Did you have any particular sources of inspiration?
Laura Yilmaz: 
Yes, the seed of the idea was riffing on classic Snow White and the magic mirror imagery, but with a Japanese pop twist. The idea expanded and developed, so whatever hints of the Snow White mythos might remain are blurred under layers of kaleidoscopic shapes and weirdly deformed limbs!

TI: Also, the Japanese schoolgirl has become a very iconic image to American audiences that embodies quiet, subservient cuteness. We wanted to create imagery of schoolgirls who came alive on screen with explosive energy and dance moves that subverted that stereotype in visually shocking ways.

TP: Were there any particularly difficult aspects of making this video?
LY: 
All the animation for Crystal’s dress is hand drawn frame by frame, meaning we had to track our animation to the live action footage by eye. It was a nightmare to manage the workflow and keep all the animation tracked properly.
In the end we had to compartmentalize the team a bit so each animator could really take ownership of one element: the dress, the schoolgirl arms and faces, etc.

TP: What’s next?
TI: 
I’m in preproduction to direct a larger project this fall, and I think both Laura and I are looking forward to more opportunities to collaborate in the future.

 

Margaret Cho - Asian Adjacent

Asian Adjacent


The ever-fabulous Margaret Cho never disappoints, and her latest, spectacularly over-the-top music video is certainly no exception.

In the appropriately-titled "Asian Adjacent," Cho tries on a variety of stereotypical Eastern looks -- appearing as a caged tiger and a pale-faced geisha, then as a "Miss Saigon"-style farm girl -- while singing along to an '80s-sounding synth-pop beat.

"You got one of those faces, and almond shanty eyes," the 42-year-old performer croons. "You could be from lots of places, like Alaska or Ha-Ha-Hawaii." She shows off her many tattoos in a sultry sushi segment that's sure to recall "Sex and the City: The Movie." Also appearing is singer-songwriter Grant Lee Phillips, who co-wrote the song with Cho.

The track, which Cho has described as being about people who look like they should have Asian heritage, but don't, can be found on her Grammy-nominated "Cho Dependent" album. 

Asian Adjacent


The ever-fabulous Margaret Cho never disappoints, and her latest, spectacularly over-the-top music video is certainly no exception.

In the appropriately-titled "Asian Adjacent," Cho tries on a variety of stereotypical Eastern looks -- appearing as a caged tiger and a pale-faced geisha, then as a "Miss Saigon"-style farm girl -- while singing along to an '80s-sounding synth-pop beat.

"You got one of those faces, and almond shanty eyes," the 42-year-old performer croons. "You could be from lots of places, like Alaska or Ha-Ha-Hawaii." She shows off her many tattoos in a sultry sushi segment that's sure to recall "Sex and the City: The Movie." Also appearing is singer-songwriter Grant Lee Phillips, who co-wrote the song with Cho.

The track, which Cho has described as being about people who look like they should have Asian heritage, but don't, can be found on her Grammy-nominated "Cho Dependent" album. 

Blue Sky

Blue Sky


Blue Sky is an experimental film about the aftermath of a young girl’s sexual assault and the waking nightmares that follow. The film takes an intimate look at the healing process between a mother and daughter through dance and the shakuhachi voices of the ancestors. Through deserts, rich green fields, sky and deep underwater, Blue Sky does not look away, rather, it takes the audience through the healing process with an unflinching eye. The painful, beautiful, obsessive revisiting of a moment as we remember it. Through written letters, the young girl tries to articulate her experience into concrete words, trying to tell her mother what happened. The film explores new avenues of telling and expressing the loss of something so deep and earth shattering.

Blue Sky calls us back to ourselves as we rise like dust, summoned by the voice of the ancestors. We revisit childhood songs and memories that take us into the realm of past innocents and a loving mother daughter relationship. The film asks the question, how do we begin to live again after death? In the end, the thing that saves us from drowning in our past is love. The young woman is able to find her way back through the song of her mother’s loving voice. The beginning of the real healing process can occur once the first breath is taken and the young woman can begin to real again. Blue Sky brings each painful moment closer and embraces the old wounds, saying ‘Holy, Holy.’

 

Blue Sky


Blue Sky is an experimental film about the aftermath of a young girl’s sexual assault and the waking nightmares that follow. The film takes an intimate look at the healing process between a mother and daughter through dance and the shakuhachi voices of the ancestors. Through deserts, rich green fields, sky and deep underwater, Blue Sky does not look away, rather, it takes the audience through the healing process with an unflinching eye. The painful, beautiful, obsessive revisiting of a moment as we remember it. Through written letters, the young girl tries to articulate her experience into concrete words, trying to tell her mother what happened. The film explores new avenues of telling and expressing the loss of something so deep and earth shattering.

Blue Sky calls us back to ourselves as we rise like dust, summoned by the voice of the ancestors. We revisit childhood songs and memories that take us into the realm of past innocents and a loving mother daughter relationship. The film asks the question, how do we begin to live again after death? In the end, the thing that saves us from drowning in our past is love. The young woman is able to find her way back through the song of her mother’s loving voice. The beginning of the real healing process can occur once the first breath is taken and the young woman can begin to real again. Blue Sky brings each painful moment closer and embraces the old wounds, saying ‘Holy, Holy.’

 

Tribal feat. Shine Blackhawk

Tribal


Tribal


Tah Mac “California” feat. Tony DeNiro & Keely

California


California


Favianna's Story

1in3


The 1 in 3 Campaign is a grassroots movement to start a new conversation about abortion—telling our stories, on our own terms. Together, we can end the stigma and shame women are made to feel about abortion. As we share our stories we begin to build a culture of compassion, empathy, and support for access to basic health care. It’s time for us to come out in support of each other and in support of access to legal and safe abortion care in our communities.

The 1 in 3 campaign builds on the success of prior social change movements, harnessing the power of storytelling to engage and inspire action and strengthen support for abortion access. By encouraging women who have had abortions to end their silence, share their stories, and start a new and more personal conversation about abortion in our society, the 1 in 3 Campaign will help create a more enabling cultural environment for the policy and legal work of the abortion rights movement.

1in3


The 1 in 3 Campaign is a grassroots movement to start a new conversation about abortion—telling our stories, on our own terms. Together, we can end the stigma and shame women are made to feel about abortion. As we share our stories we begin to build a culture of compassion, empathy, and support for access to basic health care. It’s time for us to come out in support of each other and in support of access to legal and safe abortion care in our communities.

The 1 in 3 campaign builds on the success of prior social change movements, harnessing the power of storytelling to engage and inspire action and strengthen support for abortion access. By encouraging women who have had abortions to end their silence, share their stories, and start a new and more personal conversation about abortion in our society, the 1 in 3 Campaign will help create a more enabling cultural environment for the policy and legal work of the abortion rights movement.

Viennie V Hold My Breath

I'll Hold My Breathe


I'll Hold My Breathe


Turn of the Harvest

Turn of the Harvest


Turn of the Harvest


Synecdoche

Synecdoche


 

Synecdoche


 

Bonobo Documentary

Bonobo Documentary


Bonobo Documentary


Slingerland Institute

Slingerland


Slingerland


The Michelle Obama DIARIES

The Michelle Obama Diaries


The Michelle Obama Diaries